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Trinity College Dublin

Dublin University Harriers and Athletic Club

Training Guide

General Tips: (In no particular order)

  • P.M.A.: Positive Mental Attitude. Believe in yourself. You can do it if you put your mind to it.
  • Enjoy your training.
  • Always stretch.
  • Drink 3 litres of fluid per day (Water and Milk, not Tea, Coffee, Alcohol or RedBull as they are all diuretics). Carry a water bottle around with you and take regular drinks. If possible, try and drink water during training, especially on long runs and when training indoors.
  • Eat sensibly.
  • Get enough sleep.
  • If you find that you haven't recovered from the previous days training it could mean one / some or all of the following: Not stretching properly, Not eating properly, Not getting enough sleep, Not drinking enough water or Training too hard.
  • Wear proper running shoes.
  • If it is cold or wet outside, dress accordingly so as not to pick up any avoidable injuries or colds.

Getting back into training after a layoff:

The following paragraphs were written as a Summer Holiday Plan, to get people fit for the start of term, based on how long a lay off they had had prior to exams. It is a 3 month plan but can be used at any time during the year.

Dear All,

I was talking to Mick on Saturday and asked him for an update on the training advice he gave earlier in the holidays.

The Advice is as follows:

  • For all those people who haven't been training: You should follow Program 1. This will get you half ways fit for Maynooth, but unfortunately you won't be at your best, but not to worry, the foundation laying will stand you to good stead come the Cross Country.
  • For those people who resumed training after the exams but due to work commitments etc etc, stopped running come the middle of June: You should follow Program 2. This will get you into pretty good shape come Maynooth enabling you to clock a good time for the team.
  • For those people who have been following Program 1 all summer, just keep on following it.
  • For those people who have been following Program 2 & 3 all summer, just keep on following them with a few minor alterations, to weeks 11-14 as follows:
  • **If you are concentrating on the 1-mile leg: You should be aiming for 3 sessions every 2 weeks. The sessions should be along the following lines 8x300m with 90 sec recovery or 8x400m with 90 sec recovery. (The 300s would be done at a faster pace than the 400s)(And some other derivatives on these sessions, such as Niall's 300/200 session. Drop down to training on Monday nights for more information)
  • **If you are concentrating on the 2-mile leg: You should be aiming for 3 sessions every 2 weeks. The sessions should be along the following lines 8x400m with 90 sec recovery or 6x800m with 3mins recovery. (The 400s would be done only slightly faster that the 800s)(Slowly reducing the recovery as the weeks go by.)
  • **If you are concentrating on the 3-mile leg: You should be aiming for 3 sessions every 2 weeks. The sessions should be along the following lines 6x800m with 3 min recovery or 5x1000m with 3.5 min recovery (slowly reducing the recovery as the weeks go by.) This will have you in tip-top condition for Maynooth and will enable you to clock a serious time, which will hopefully help the team to win a medal.

Program 1:

Aimed at people who haven't trained for 4 or more months and who didn't train seriously over the winter (i.e. only trained on Mondays and Wednesdays until the Cross Country). Upon resuming training you should spend:

Week 1-6: doing easy jogs 4 days a week (Aerobic workout: 7.30min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 140 at all times.) Starting with 10mins per run in the first week and building this up each week, making sure to keep the pulse below 140.

Week 7-9: doing steady jogs 3 days a week (Aerobic workout: 7min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 156 at all times, so as you are below Threshold at all times) and doing an easy jog on 1-2 days a week in addition to the steady jogs (Aerobic workout: 7.30min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 140 at all times.)

The idea behind these 9 weeks is to build up your base level of fitness so as you are properly conditioned for when you start doing sessions.

Week 10-14: 2 steady runs, 2 easy runs and 1 session. The session should consist of 8x400m(90sec recovery) or 3x1000m (3.30min recovery) at a pace that is well within your capabilities.

This should bring you up to roughly the 1st October, and ready to start into serious training from week one (i.e. 2 sessions per week, 1 fast run, 1 steady run and 1 long easy run), in the knowledge that you have all your base work done.

Program 2:

Aimed at people who haven't trained for 2 or more months and who trained 4 days a week for the cross country and the Track. Upon resuming training you should spend:

Week 1-3: doing easy jogs 4 days a week (Aerobic workout: 7.30min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 140 at all times.) Starting with 15mins per run in the first week and building this up each week, making sure to keep the pulse below 140.

Week 4-6: doing steady jogs 3 days a week (Aerobic workout: 7min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 156 at all times, so as you are below Threshold at all times) and doing an easy jog on 2 days a week in addition to the steady jogs. (Aerobic workout: 7.30min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 140 at all times.)

The idea behind these 6 weeks is to build up your base level of fitness so as you are properly conditioned for when you start doing sessions.

Week 7-10: 2 steady runs, 2 easy runs and 1 session. The session should consist of 8x400m(90sec recovery) or 3x1000m (3.30min recovery) at a pace that is well within your capabilities.

Week 11-14: 2 steady runs, 2 easy runs and 1 session. The session should consist of 12x400m(90sec recovery) or 4x1000m (3.30min recovery) at a pace that is well within your capabilities. Or 8x400m(90sec recovery) or 3x1000m (3.30min recovery) but at a faster pace to the previous 4 weeks but one that is still within your capabilities.

This should bring you up to roughly the 1st October, and ready to start into serious training from week one (i.e. 2 sessions per week, 1 fast run, 2 steady run and 1 long easy run), in the knowledge that you have all your base work done.

Program 3:

Aimed at people who have been training through exams or only ended up taking 2-3 weeks off for exams and you were training 5+days a week through the winter and up to and including the Track & Field Championships.

Basically you want to spend the summer building up a good solid base, getting in 1 session (12x400m 90sec recovery or 4-5x1000m,3.30 min recovery, at a pace that makes these feel easy and enjoyable), 1-2 long easy runs (Aerobic workout: 10 miles 7.30min+ pace for men and what ever the Female equivalent is. i.e. pulse below 140 at all times. Women want to be doing 6-7 mile instead of the 10 for men), 3 steady runs(3-6 miles) and 1 fast run (4-6miles 6.45min or less pace, and the female equivalent, pulse 170bpm). If you wish you can do a race every 3-5 weeks so as to enable you to monitor progress.

This program may sound seriously easy but Mick said that we should concentrate on building a good base and resting up so as when he returns in October you are ready for the serious training that he has planned.

Points to note for Everyone:

  1. Make sure that you are enjoying your training at all times. If not, take a break for a few weeks and try out some different sports: cycling, tennis, swimming, squash to name but a few.
  2. Make sure to stretch properly after every training session. If your not sure come down and ask someone on Monday nights before you head off for the summer. Also there is a fully illustrated article on stretching in the current issue of the Irish Runner magazine (cost 1.95) which I would seriously suggest that you buy.
  3. Build some basic circuits into you stretching program 2-3 times a week after your easy runs. Press-ups, crunches, lower abs (very important), squats, hyperextensions. These are designed to condition your body and not to build up cardiovascular fitness. Your pulse shouldn't really be going above 135 when doing these mini circuits. You will find this extra strength of huge benefit, especially in twisty sections of a cross-country race, like for example the wooded section in Santry where you have streams and logs to jump over.
  4. Try and make sure that come the 1st of September you have started back training. Follow Program 1 (above) until college starts back in October. A five-week head start on the other Universities can make a big difference come Maynooth/Cross Country.
  5. Invest in a proper pair of running shoes. The general rule it that the more you pay for a pair of runners the less time you will spend injured and hence the less you will be spending on physiotherapy treatment (well that's one of my many theories on running. I'm sure there are people out there who say otherwise.) The same rule applies for stretching, the more time you spend stretching the less likely you are to get injured.

The 5km and up, Cross Country / Road Training Guide:

MEN:
The 7-day Guide:
Monday:Speed Work 400m - 1000m.
Tuesday:LSD* - 6 miles (Pulse < 140bpm, 7.30min/mile pace or slower).
Wednesday:**10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work/Circuits OR easy 35 minute jog.
Thursday:6 miles - Fast but not too fast (Vary it from week to week. E.g. go fast every 2nd or 3rd week only).
Friday:**10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work/Circuits OR easy 35 minute jog.
Saturday:Strength Work Khyber or Munich hills in the Phoenix Park.
Sunday:***LSD* - 10-12 miles of Grass (Pulse < 140bpm, 7.30min/mile pace or slower).
* Long Slow Distance. Essential in preventing lactate build up during Speed Work, hence enabling you to run faster.
** If you do the 35-minute jog on Wednesday then do the Gym/Circuits option on Friday or vice versa.
*** If you haven't recovered from your Sunday run by the Speed Work on Monday night then you are running either too fast or for too long or both on Sunday. Build up to 10-12 miles over 2-3 months.
The 6-day Guide:
Monday:Speed Work 400m - 1000m.
Tuesday:LSD* - 6 miles (Pulse < 140bpm, 7.30min/mile pace or slower).
Thursday:6 miles - Fast but not too fast (Vary it from week to week. E.g. go fast every 2nd or 3rd week only).
Friday:** 10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work / Circuits OR easy 35 minute jog.
Saturday:Strength Work Khyber or Munich hills in the Phoenix Park.
Sunday:*** LSD* - 10-12 miles of Grass (Pulse < 140bpm, 7.30min/mile pace or slower).
* Long Slow Distance. Essential in preventing lactate build up during Speed Work, hence enabling you to run faster.
** This session could be done on Wednesday, but is more beneficial on Friday to aid recovery form Thursday in advance of Saturday.
*** If you haven't recovered from your Sunday run by the Speed Work on Monday night then you are running either too fast or for too long or both on Sunday. Build up to 10-12 miles over 2-3 months.
The 5-day Guide:
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Either Wednesday*, Thursday* or Friday*.
*Alternate on a weekly basis between doing a 6 mile run and Circuits.

All the training in these programs are designed to compliment each other. LSD on Tuesday and Sunday to let you recover from Monday and Saturday. Easy days on Wednesday and Friday to prepare you for Thursday and Saturday.

The 4km and up, Cross Country / Road Training Guide:

WOMEN:
The 7-day Guide:
Monday:Speed Work 400m - 1000m.
Tuesday:LSD* - 6 miles (Pulse < 140bpm, 8 min/mile pace or slower).
Wednesday:**10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work/Circuits OR easy 30 minute jog.
Thursday:3 miles - Fast but not too fast OR 6 miles steady. (Vary it from week to week).
Friday:**10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work/Circuits OR easy 30 minute jog.
Saturday:Strength Work Khyber or Munich hills in the Phoenix Park.
Sunday:***LSD* - 7-9 miles of Grass (Pulse < 140bpm, 8 min/mile pace or slower).
* Long Slow Distance. Essential in preventing lactate build up during Speed Work, hence enabling you to run faster.
** If you do the 35-minute jog on Wednesday then do the Gym/Circuits option on Friday or vice versa.
*** If you haven't recovered from your Sunday run by the Speed Work on Monday night then you are running either too fast or for too long or both on Sunday. Build up to 7-9 miles over 2 months.
The 6-day Guide:
Monday:Speed Work 400m - 1000m.
Tuesday:LSD* - 6 miles (Pulse < 140bpm, 8 min/mile pace or slower).
Thursday:3 miles - Fast but not too fast OR 6 miles steady. (Vary it from week to week).
Friday:**10 minutes jogging & exercise bike & Gym work/Circuits OR easy 35 minute jog.
Saturday:Strength Work Khyber or Munich hills in the Phoenix Park.
Sunday:***LSD* - 10-12 miles of Grass (Pulse < 140bpm, 8 min/mile pace or slower).
* Long Slow Distance. Essential in preventing lactate build up during Speed Work, hence enabling you to run faster.
** This session could be done on Wednesday, but is more beneficial on Friday to aid recovery form Thursday in advance of Saturday.
*** If you haven't recovered from your Sunday run by the Speed Work on Monday night then you are running either too fast or for too long or both on Sunday. Build up to 7-9 miles over 2 months.
The 5-day Guide:
Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday and Either Wednesday*, Thursday* or Friday*.
* Alternate on a weekly basis between doing a 3 or 6 mile run and Circuits.

All the training in these programs are designed to compliment each other. LSD on Tuesday and Sunday to let you recover from Monday and Saturday. Easy days on Wednesday and Friday to prepare you for Thursday and Saturday.